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Marketing campaigns that shaped society

Marketing campaigns that shaped society

Powerful Marketing Campaigns­

The ability to make a difference and job satisfaction are so closely linked, most people will not remain in a role unless they feel as if they have a sense of purpose. Marketeers you are no different. Here are creative campaigns, we simply can’t resist mentally high-fiving and supporting. ­

Dove really made their mark in society with a double dose of viral marketing campaigns. Ten years after the Real Beauty exhibition, portrayed a variety of figures, they rolled out the Dove evolution illustrating the way in which Photoshop derails our perceptions of beauty. This sparked serious discussions about media and their responsibility to readers, among media professionals and ordinary people. Dove is definitely recognised for its ability to create campaigns that went viral, before going viral was even a goal. They don’t piggyback on causes; they create them and effectively shape society in a positive way.­

More recently, Dove hired a criminal sketch artist to draw women based on their account of what they thought they looked like. The results didn’t just shock participants; they made a widespread comment about women’s self esteem.

Special K repositioned themselves from a company, that built their success on a weight lose desire to a healthy lifestyle/ body aspiration. They made their mark in the world in 2013, by generating an eerie social experiment. Women walked into a clothing store with clothing labels and subtle banners displaying self- deprecating statements- sourced from twitter. These labels had fat-talk statements like “Cellulite is in my DNA #Cow” and “You look Okay from the neck up”.

You wouldn’t say it to someone else, so why would you say it to/ about yourself? The recorded experiment served to remind women how damaging these words and thoughts are, as 93 percent of women will fat-talk According to Special K, this behaviour acts as a barrier to effective weight lose. This sparked a series of debates around the way in which women treat or perceive themselves.­
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Mirror, mirror on the wall, what is IKEA up to now?

Swedish company, IKEA organised a motivational mirror, which calls out personalised compliments to Britons in their store. This was done after research revealed, 26 percent of people feel uncomfortable looking in the mirror or feel worse after seeing themselves in the mirror. IKEA restored morale and reinvented the mirror by transforming its effect. This campaign reinforced positive feelings towards their products and interacted with consumers in a personal way.­

Nestle decided to create a social experiment, which captured and recorded the number of times people look at a woman’s’ breasts. This was done in partnership with Keep A Breast foundation, to encourage women to check themselves for cancer. The premise was that you may be surprised how often people check out your boobs, but how often do you check yourself? #CheckYourSelfie
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The most alluring part of marketing is the breadth of creativity, that can be implemented and the difference one can make. To make your work count in society, work for a company, that will realise the potential in your ideas.­

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