A visit to Ibaraki, Japan

By Helios Lo, Resourcer – Technology, Hong Kong

Ibaraki is close to Tokyo and it takes around 2 hours to get there by JR Joban Line. It’s known for beautiful scenery and tranquillity but also as one of the heavily damaged prefectures after 311 Earthquake. I joined a fund-raising event with my Japanese schoolmates when I was in Finland in 2011 and had long wanted to visit the area.

There have been lots of rumours saying that the products and land are heavily polluted by the radiation, but I have to say these prefectures have been doing their best to ensure their products are safe to take. If you are planning to visit Japan do spend some time in Fukushima, Ibaraki, Miyagi, and Iwate and you’ll see how hard the locals are working to rebuild the area.

These photos are from Mito, Ibaraki last week. Mito-chan is the mascot of Mito city. Her head contains Natto (Japanese beans) meaning with good harvest, and the flowers on her head are the symbol of love. Her hands mean the hope and you will find her everywhere in Mito

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The Sakura River is in the southern part of the Mito city, where lots of people love to walk along the river.

Ibaraki is also famous for fruits and veggies like chestnuts, melon and blueberries. You will find a wide range of Ibaraki products at Excel, the department store at the JR station.

The trip helped me to think about the meaning of life and I saw hopes and smiles from the Ibaraki inhabitants. It reminded me how important it is to enjoy your life and treasure the ones you love and care.

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